Press Start Leadership Podcast

Conversations With Christopher: Terry Cook

July 19, 2021 Season 1 Episode 31
Press Start Leadership Podcast
Conversations With Christopher: Terry Cook
Show Notes Transcript

In this week's episode of the Press Start Leadership Podcast, we introduce Conversations with Christopher with special guest Terry Cook.

We discuss with Terry podcasting, driving instruction, donuts, and his thoughts on Leadership, Games, and Awesomeness.

You can find Terry Cook at:
Website: https://www.tcdrive.co.uk/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tcdriving_school/
Twitter:  @TCDrive1
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TCDrivingSchool/

Link to my FREE ebook: 5 Heroic Leadership Skills

Music by: Joey the Mad Scientist

Hit subscribe/follow and be sure to check out: https://pressstartleadership.com/

Support the show (https://paypal.me/pressstartleadership)
Joey The Mad Scientist:

Hey there press starters and welcome to the press Start leadership podcast, the podcast about game changing leadership teaching you how to get the most out of your product and development team and become the leader you were meant to be leadership coaching and training for the International game industry professional. Now, let me introduce you to your host, the man the myth, the legend, Christopher Mifsud.

Christopher Mifsud:

Welcome back for starters, to another special edition of the press star leadership podcast conversations with Christopher. On this week's edition. We had Terry cook, driver, instructor and podcast host extraordinare. Now, let's be Terry code.

Terry Cook:

Hello, sir. Christopher, how are we doing? We're doing good. I am well packed for my move. So the background is empty is all get out. But we just we just deal with that. I've moved anything that looked innocuous in the background. So it'll be good. It'll be a good show. I'm sure. I'm sure. So, Terry, I've known you for a little while now. And I've gotten to know you. But I'm pretty sure other than maybe your your followers that are checking this out.

Christopher Mifsud:

Most of my folks won't know who Terry cook is. So I always like to ask, What is your origin story? Where did the Terry cook come from and begin his journey? Where did he get to?

Terry Cook:

I mean, I can go right back to the womb, but I'm presuming it almost gone that far. So

Christopher Mifsud:

it's up to you. I there's probably listeners that would actually be interested in that. And I don't judge,

Unknown:

but we probably could skip ahead a little bit. Okay, cool. Yeah, so, I mean, going back, it's quite interesting set a bit of a realization recently that when I was back at school, one of the big things I wanted to do, I'm 39 this year so we're talking 25 years ago, one of the things I wanted to do was be a radio DJ that was always a bit of a passion of mine and I got tired of it fuel for ridicule and mocking and stuff like that. So I kind of gave up that idea and went and became a joiner and I but not just that I actually met on a personal level I let that ridicule and that mocking massively affect me in those early teenage years. We still affects me a little bit now. To be fair, somewhat I'm trying to grow out of that. But yeah, from there I became a joiner slash Carpenter however we want to phrase that worked on the building sites for probably best part of a decade. Manager knock Naka my backup doing that.

Christopher Mifsud:

Now good.

Unknown:

No, well, yeah, definitely not good. I remember one particular Christmas, I was on my hands and knees to kind of get up the stairs. I were doing it for probably about a week at a crawl up the stairs rather than them walk. Yes. Now for now for fun. No, no, there was no funny or have. Although to be fair, remember, it wasn't paid. It was like a physical inability to, to to the user. Yeah, gotcha. Gotcha. And then every now and again, I'll be walking on just like collapse and fall down on spot. But yes,

Christopher Mifsud:

less than optimal. Yeah. You found something else?

Unknown:

Well, yeah, my my partner of the time jokingly suggested that I should get a job in McDonald's. I was like, actually, that's not a bad idea. Because it was Christmas time. And I was sick of working on the rules in snow. And I thought I can go get somewhere warm over Christmas. So I went to McDonald's word in kitchen, and probably about 26 of age and I just fell in love with me. Which I never expected to do. I was very much being completely honest. Fast food or McDonald's worker snob at the time sure.

Christopher Mifsud:

But it was like people are I would say most people but there's a lot of people are like that. Yeah, they don't understand.

Unknown:

Yeah, it's hard work. It is only working now that kind of have my eyes up to where but I fell in love with Job said there for about five years worked my way up to I wasn't I don't think I was running stores but I was in a position to be put into run stores. In fact, I'm going to jump back site and I'll tell you a quick story of that McDonald's snobbery in the go for I never wanted to go on the service counter on the on the till because I was embarrassed by that. You know, people will see me working in McDonald's. But to progress you got to have to do everything. So On the tiller, there was just one day this this this block comes up with his daughter. I think it was dosh brings her up and she's only little. And it says you want to ask this man. And she goes something along the lines of my daddy says when I get older, I don't want to work in a place like this. And I don't know how to answer that. I was kind of sneak sleet dauphins background somewhere. But yeah, that's not the nicest thing to say to people. But

Christopher Mifsud:

yeah, vassals out there. They don't know any better. Well, maybe he should have said something. Well, yeah,

Unknown:

I did not then but like going forward. It was like, as I progressed, this, I think when I was looking after myself, I wasn't bothered. But when I like when they said management session is like, no one speaks to my stuff like that. And I remember after an overnight one night, there was some, one of the last his must have been 1718 should you'd got the order office, someone, you know, a suit, an office worker, and it was given us some rare grief. And I remember just walking over, I can't remember the exact words, but I'm just like, not just got again, money back. Is that bothers, you've got to kind of kick him out stone, like you don't speak Thai stuff like that. But that wasn't good to me. I won't bother. But yeah. So yeah, so from McDonald's. After about five years, my wife got diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. I won't go into that whole story. But basically, as I said to them, or they said, Is there anything we can do to help? And I said, Yes, just leave me in this star. Just the one star wasn't the time leave me six months, because it's the closest to home. You know, I was assuming that kind of stuff. And it'll just work. Just don't forget me for at least six months. And the next week, the movements of the staff restore. Yeah.

Christopher Mifsud:

See, that's that and that's, that's, that says something about leadership right there and management and not listening to the people that you obviously, you ask them specifically, how can we help you and you do the exact opposite. And we see it so often and across everywhere, not just, you know, retail and the food industry but but everywhere. It's just bad management. And it's, it's, it's the reason why people leave, you know, like, number one people people don't, you know, clearly bosses they leave, you know, that poor management, poor leadership. So that's the same, because definitely, they lost the route. Well, I just sound like and I know, they lost a really good worker, and someone that probably could have could have, you know, done really well for them. So, sucks.

Unknown:

I have my weak points, but I remember one of my stoppages we all do. I remember one of my store managers saying to me says you divide stalls 5050 it says half that love you, because you come in, and you make change, and you work with a good people. And there's half that hate you because you actually make them work. So I always took that as a big compliment. But I remember when they shifted them stars, it was because someone at the other store, they'd swap me with, I can remember what I done. But basically, it done something on the outside when we met other staff. I remember thinking, hold on, so I'm getting punished for his misdemeanor. Yeah,

Christopher Mifsud:

yeah, that happens quite a bit actually, too. That's I mean, it's another another Well, obviously, it's all wrapped up in the same lesson. But another lesson where were people who do good work get punished because people who don't do good work, right, I was on a job where they enforce this like really strict working hours policy. Because there were two employees out of many employees that weren't following like we're abusing the more open and relaxed our situation. And, and like they did this before I joined it when I joined. I was like, Wait, what? you punished everybody because the two people I was like, do you think do you think the people are gonna be upset about those two people or they're gonna be angry at you gonna be angry at you because you're the ones that are forcing this on people right? Like instead of nipping this in the bud and being like a leader and talking to the people that were fucking up and getting them to in reward and rewarding all the other people and keeping them happy with the things that you punished everyone I was like, that is the stupidest shit I've ever heard in my entire life. I was like, but I'll be honest, this is one that was one of many many things that I should have picked on pot very early that taught me that Oh, you guys do lots of stupid shit. So I see. But you know that's that's like live and learn right? But yeah, it's why would you do that? I don't get it. It seems as backwards but for some strange reason they people think punishment and grandiose punishment for whatever reason, like the wrong people like this is the way to do it. And they probably weren't thinking as punishment, right? They're probably just like, Oh, we need to get this person out. So we're gonna move this person over here not realizing the ramifications that like oh, wow, we baby you just disciplined this person or maybe like and got rid of them, as opposed to moving the problem to someplace else. Yeah, so it's done. But anyway, continue.

Unknown:

No, you're Have a sound right? I mean, I can even remember being back at school back at primary school which, or anyone not in the UK that sort of up to about 11 I think it is. And I remember saying to my mum, one time, I was probably about seven or eight and saying akmola, naughty kids are getting these trees. And it's like, you'd be nice school. So then you know that one day where you beat yourself and you get rewarded, but then the people, you know, the sock cops like me, though, will be able to self every time. They didn't get those rewards. So I can almost see right back to those early school years. And it's something that I've taken, I mean, I'm jumping out of it now. But it's something I've taken into what I do now with a as a driving instructor, because one of the things that was drummed into me when I first become an instructor, if someone cancels on a lesson you're charging, so if someone cancels within 48 hours of a lesson you're charging, because obviously, it's my

Christopher Mifsud:

Yeah, why you can't you can't do anything else at that point. So yeah, it makes sense.

Unknown:

But I don't anymore. I used to, but it's like tiring everyone with that same brush. And if if someone's mom gets rushed in the hospital, right, yeah. And then it's like, well, how much do you follow up? So now I'll just work on, you mess me about all you got to charged. But this person here that has 10 lessons, and it's perfect. And let me move to lessons about?

Christopher Mifsud:

So it's that it's not so black and white? It's a gray area that you take on? Right? Like, it's something that I say a lot of times is that the there are no exceptions, but everyone's an exception. Right? Like, you just have to take the realization that you have to have rules that are kind of there that you can't enforce. But you have to realize that there are a lot of circumstances and everyone's life is slightly different. And there's different reasons for why things are. There's your happiness, that's cool. Out of curiosity, has that like by not doing it that way? Have you like, gotten like, better praise it like more appointments, more work? Like is it been a positive side to not being an asshole? 100%? I think there would be. A lot of people need to hear that. Because I think a lot of people think, Oh, I need to be this way. Because blah. And it's like I try and push as much as possible. You know, what if you're actually a kind person and you treat people really cool, like you'll actually get better results? Right? It's provable.

Unknown:

Yeah. And I find it fascinating the one year not, alas, there are still some people that will think you're in us. So even when you're just being raped by people, and I'm going to use a current example, and you'll probably listen to this. So I'm not going to say his name. But Hi. He, for months and months and months is the driving test bolt. And I've messaged him asking about driving lessons. And he's like, No, no, no, when he one day when he sent me a screenshot of his bank account with a large sum in it, and said, I'm gonna send you a lump of money soon. So we can have these lessons. And then you know, another paytrail us never took them. And it got so a few weeks away from his test. And I'm like, I'm a bit concerned that you've not messaged me about these lessons. And it goes, all there's no point no cars off the road. And bescom back had been off their opportunities at that point. So what about the six months before then? You know, but we went for this assessment lesson. And I bescot pointed out error roofing that was incorrect. And then he's not happy with that is like yes, but I will do this on my test about you. So I'm basically being completely right by him, stood by him, you know, when he's not doing less than the stuff took him for this assessment. That's why most insurance will addiction by them. And he's then saying that I'm not doing right by him by doing this. So even by so not being there. So there's still people that because it's not suitable for them will, will think are being asked, but just bringing it back round to the positive side, like you mentioned, and unnecessarily it's got me more custom, although I may have isn't in the big picture for the where people refer me. But it's definitely built a better relationship with some students. You know, I can remember when I worked started off. Yeah, yeah. Yeah. I wanted to have a national driving school and there was someone that cancelled short notice, like a member should never cancel before. But these guys had kind of trained me charge charge charge. And she will, you know, she will genuinely believes you're genuinely alone. And I'm like, I'm gonna have to charge you. And she's, that's really sad. I remember that text message. That's really sad. And I thought, yeah, is I I'm not charging you, not charging you. Unless you pay for another 10 hours or something and continue lessons with me, she might have gone somewhere else otherwise. And it's, to me, it's looking after the good people and that doesn't mean ditching the bad people. You know, you can still provide them with the same support. It's up to them if they take at all, but your look after they're good people.

Christopher Mifsud:

No, that's great. That's totally awesome. So so please continue, like how did you like you, we stopped at McDonald's, but you can I touched on what you're doing now. But we're where we were to get you. How'd you get to where you are? What are you doing?

Unknown:

Well, from McDonald's, when I initially moved, I stayed there for walks. I did actually like the style of move. So it was just the convenience of getting back and forth from home and stuff. That was a big thing. I offer my resignation. I didn't refuse it. They said, after they said, you can go whenever you want. I offered to work through the summer for them, because it's obviously a big issue. They said you don't have to work for the summer, but then kind of kept me for the summer anyway. So and then I've been yet. Yeah, I think they wanted me to do it without them having to actually ask me, which, you know, whatever. But But yeah, from there, I thought, right. I'm not enough. I'm just gonna quit and I'll work some out and became a professional gambler for you.

Christopher Mifsud:

That's an adventure. Yeah. Not not the year. So that means you, you You doing okay with it? Yeah, on a monthly basis. I wasn't ready for a year. Yeah.

Unknown:

Yeah, I was making more than I made at McDonald's. And I wasn't a decent decent wage at McDonald's by the time I finished, and then it paid for all my trading open to doing the driving stuff as well. But it's not necessarily the best long term strategy.

Christopher Mifsud:

And always wins.

Unknown:

Yeah, I mean, I'm not risk averse, necessarily, you can probably tell, but not necessarily the best option, especially when I'm trying to support the wife and the stepson and whatnot. So yeah, that last about a year. And then I was trying to think about what to get into. So I looked at years before but got sold out off by by an ex was been a driving instructor. So

Christopher Mifsud:

why not? Why why we thought of it. But what was the what was the interest there? What What drew you to being a driving instructor?

Unknown:

It was one. Before once McDonald's, I was looking for jobs around that time, as I said, because of the back. And I saw this advert for this national driving school. And like, that's what I want to do. Because I've always worked with people in in terms of culture, and in terms of training that I've always been in, like most of the stars were in a McDonald's and I was probably in five, I think I was almost always eventually put in charge of the train and the apprenticeships. And I always like the one on one training more than big group training. And don't get more one in one than being in a car.

Christopher Mifsud:

So True enough. Yeah. And the life on the line, you know that? Yes, yes, at times, including this morning. I'm not gonna give that stock. That's fine. But just for everyone knows that we're recording this on July 11. So I just wanted to call that out. But yeah,

Unknown:

because she doesn't listen to my podcast, you're not always going to be very embarrassed.

Christopher Mifsud:

That's all the illusion will give. That's Yeah.

Unknown:

Although there's plenty, plenty of little stories, not just this morning. But I'm sure. But yeah, it's a self employed job. So I'm in charge of my own income. At the time, my ex talked me out of it, because that is not the best route to go down. If we go back to my sort of childhood, as I mentioned that that bullying, kind of bullying. The bill, Ellen still affects me now. And it's still affecting my ex. So that what she says, Oh, well, I'll just go with what you said. Because you know, better than me. And it worked out for the best in the long run. But it was with my wife now. She gave me the confidence and the freedom and the acceptance that I'm allowed to do this stuff. That's awesome. Yeah, that let me do I mean, I, I started reading comic books. You could not because my wife was kind of because she allowed me to, you know, not that I needed her permission, but in a way I did. Because I didn't feel like as are allowed to do this stuff like games like comic books, like horror movies, like this sort of stuff. I didn't feel like I was allowed to and it was me and my wife, and she was like, Kashi come? Don't be a dick.

Christopher Mifsud:

You know, and it's great. Yeah, that's super awesome. Yeah, we need more people like that in our lives. 100% Yeah.

Unknown:

So yeah, so that that then led me to being a driving instructor and I signed up for a national school. I think we're not at six years now. So I've been about three years with them. And now free is in charge of my own school.

Christopher Mifsud:

And we're in Where are you doing this and we're part of the UK.

Unknown:

I along the border between Leeds of Bradford which is in Yorkshire and the reason I always emphasize between Leeds and Bradford is because I'm born and bred in Leeds, and now I've got a Bradford postcode and there's a rivalry there so I always make sure I say on the border between the two are not wholeheartedly commit to living in Bradford.

Christopher Mifsud:

Gotcha. Gotcha. Those people are probably listening as well. Yeah. I mean, they're no they're no I mean, I work in Bradford, their IRA but they're not leaves. Ah, all right, fair enough. Yeah, I don't I don't know this rivalry but it sounds intense. A soul yaksha. And you know, you're she's the greatest place in the world. Well, there you go, folks. You've heard here, apart from Brisbane, I like Brisbane. Wait, Australia? Yes. Australia. Okay. Just could just clarify, because I well know, a lot of a lot of for, you know, former, you know, British Commonwealth country, or they have like names that come from originally from the UK. Right? Yeah. So I always got a double check, because I do want to make that assumption.

Unknown:

And there's also a subtle difference between what's always a big jump between Bradford and Brisbane. I realize I kind of strung them together.

Christopher Mifsud:

I've lived all over the world. There's a guy make that mistake all the time. I've been, you know, just 12344 continents at this point. Right now. Well, yeah, whatever does matter, a lot of continents, a lot of countries and all like all different time zone. So yeah, I get it. I get it. So driver, coach, trainer, last six years. But you stumbled into something I won't say stumbled you've, you've glided you've, you've you you've burst onto the scene of something else very recently. And taking it taking it by the horns almost you're you become quite prolific and and a certain space, a space that we might be in right now. podcasting and so tell us a little bit about that. What do you what are you doing there? Like you've got multiple podcasts. You're not just doing one podcast, you're doing like multiple podcasts. This man didn't just walk in the door and say, I'm going to be one podcast like you don't get my cut my teeth. He's like, no, multiple podcasts. Let's Let's hear about that. Talk about that more.

Unknown:

I mean, I like the phrase news that burst onto the scene. And I'm pedophilic I'm not necessarily sure I'd quite agree with that. But I like it. I'm gonna take it. Yeah, there's currently two there's a third being released shortly. And there's a fourth in the pipeline. A third

Christopher Mifsud:

and fourth. Look at this guy. Yeah, come on. serious. I

Unknown:

mean, my goal is that by the end of the year, I want a podcast released Monday to Friday, every day a week. That's that's the goal, which will be kind of fun. But yeah, the first one is a podcast called the five minute theory which is is based around the UK driving the UK theory test driving theory test. Because I became very disillusioned with the where people will learn in the theory and I was able to help my learner's, but you can't really help anyone else if I'm just saying COVID them so I thought Right, well, let's produce this wonderful resource that I can give to my guys on I can then you know everyone else so as well. So it is what it says on the tin. There's some some changes coming to it for season two, but the minutes, weekly episodes that are about five minutes long, just covering this but different aspects of the theory test. And then there's some bonus episodes that I throw in most weeks. So it's probably two a week actually on that that I do most weeks. So So yeah, so that's that one. That's actually doing really well. That's regularly in the top 100 I think is of the the education podcasts in the UK, which is is pretty cool. I'm edging edging towards towards the magical 10,000 figure in terms of downloads, which I'm hot or hopeful or two by July by the end of July. So yeah, that's and that's

Christopher Mifsud:

me. Me too, but I'm not edging to it. Like I just hope I hit 10,000 in July that would be amazing. And blow up for me. But yeah, that's awesome, man. That's really good. He's been doing this since February.

Unknown:

The first Oh, that's a good question. It was March when the other five minute ferry went out in March because our mutual good friend Robin bass kind of gave me the the the kick up the car, so I needed to actually do it. Right. That so yeah, that was the five minute fair and that seemed people learn into your life. And then the second one that is called the instructor, which is in primarily at driving instructors. Okay, that that one in a lot of ways took a lot more confidence or a lot nicer on words, a lot more. I was a lot more reluctant to do with that. Because I didn't feel like I was worthy. Probably a good way to put it in like it's gonna be boring. No, no, listen, who am I to do with this sort of thing.

Christopher Mifsud:

So like the fact that you're having like a Wayne's a Wayne's World moment. We're not worthy. Yes. All right.

Unknown:

I got probably literally at some point. Yeah. So but then I thought, in fact, I know exactly what made me do it was I saw someone online poll. And say that I want to appear on 100 podcasts issue loaded called Metallica coaster. And I want to appear on 100 podcasts issue, who's got a podcast? And I messaged her, and are commented actually. So it was on like public and if I'm gonna commit to this, and I caught I said, I've got a podcast once went on. And she replied and said, Yeah, I'm like, crap, I've got other way now, I've got a choice.

Christopher Mifsud:

So it's funny, you didn't even have a podcast, actually. Now we're like, I've got a podcast you'd like to be on. And this person who wants to hit 100 of them, you know, that's awesome. That's pretty cool. But it just so what's this, this one more about? I know, you kind of said instructors, but I didn't had a an array of guests much like, you know, I've had an array of different styles of guests here on conversation, Christopher, which, you know, some of them are in video games, and some of them are leaders, and some of them are coaches. And some of them are, you know, a little bit of everything. So

Unknown:

on even the occasional sprinkler driving instructors. Exactly, exactly. But that's kind of our take. And so my choice, I say primarily is driving a shortlist. But my goal was initially I picked out I think there was 10 topics I wanted to talk about that affected our industry, there were things like coaching and mark in the health of instructors, because we're generally quite an unhealthy bunch

Christopher Mifsud:

sort of is that just because you're in your car all the time, you don't have the ability to like, grab healthy food. So the first thing you're going to grab is like a Bunty like that they had those right bounties.

Unknown:

This is I don't know if that's the same thing.

Christopher Mifsud:

No, what's what's the thing with like French fries, and like, what? Nevermind. Okay, I, I had an India and everyone told me it came from the UK. So I was like, This is amazing. It's french fries with like cheese on a frickin roll. And I was like, this is a meal in the UK. And they're like, Yeah, totally.

Unknown:

I mean, we have chips and cheese and a sandwich, but I don't know. Yeah.

Christopher Mifsud:

What's that called? What's that called?

Unknown:

chips and cheese sandwich. That's probably a name for it. I

Christopher Mifsud:

don't know if everyone if everyone's listening or watching this right now. And they know what the name of that a miracle food is, which I think is Bunty. But I'm not sure. Leave it in the comments or send me a message.

Unknown:

Even though it's not the UK and in particular, England is quite small. There'll be different names for wherever you go.

Christopher Mifsud:

Oh, that's fair. So I like with the different names for soda in the United States like pop and coke and yeah, yeah, exactly. Makes sense. Anyway, your guests? Oh, yes. Yes. Hell sorry. I was like asking you about why why drivers or drivers are unhealthy. I'm just assuming because they just don't have the ability to like if they're in your car all day long, right? They're not getting out and going for walks. But you are we're gonna talk about that and a little bit because you're doing something really cool right now. And yeah. Well, yeah, healthiness go on.

Unknown:

The risk of being an offensive driving instructors are quite a sensitive bunch in the way that awesome men are quite sensitive. So when you'll see a woman posting online, and then you get a lot of men, so not all men, this the same things gonna be up in a hashtag, not all driving instructors. But yes, we're all largely quite unhealthy. We sat in the car, you know, 810 1214 hours a day, potentially, sometimes when you're working to add people and I'm talking about myself how I used to be largely as well. So should I call myself in this is easy just to go as you said, to go into and grab some on healthy. And then you come on, and then you just

Christopher Mifsud:

what I would do? Yeah.

Unknown:

You come on, when you vegetate on software for TV, you got asleep, and then you get up next day. And it was same thing. And I think that's where it stems from, you know, you've already said it through. But yeah, so that's why I wanted to get their health side on it on their suffering on mental health on there as well. So I'm picking all these topics that I wanted to talk about, I thought, who do wants to talk about them with and then I put the guests into those topics. And what I found was most of them weren't instructors. Most of them were people I'd worked with outside the industry. So when if you those, it was very much a case of I want to pick the brains of these people and see what I can take to bring back into into the instructor industry. And I've got some really good feedback from that. But the other thing is a side effect of that is it's actually attracting over listeners, on instructors. It's attracting a lot of people that have their own small businesses. Because the advice is applicable to anyone, essentially, and it might be tailored for instructors, but it's applicable to anyone.

Christopher Mifsud:

Like you, you had a you had a guest that talked about I mean, I think you've talked about, you know, using using, he, him she her, they them, you know, right and the business, which is kind of an probably uncommon, or I won't say unheard of, but uncommon, probably in the industry, right, which I think affects a lot of people right now is a very important You know, subject matter and something that we need to normalize quite a bit more.

Unknown:

Yeah, well, let's, I would still say a large portion of around industry is still 1020 years, you know, working that that period ago, they've not moved on with, with a lot of aspects of life in general. And that's not everyone, again, hashtag not all instructors. For it's, it's a large section. And I wanted to get someone out to talk about that. And I knew someone called g sabini. Roberts, and they come on did an absolutely wonderful episode. And it's made a difference. And this is one of the things I'm most proud of from the show is genuinely the difference in the sparks and debate online, you know, whilst the, the the episode itself didn't make the change, it almost was a spark for some of it. So it sparked some debate. It caused the GE who come on the show she sorry, they have also called training course called the queer box that is aimed at small businesses to help them help those businesses become better allies and become more LGBTQ plus friendly. And that side of it, and they've now partnered up with an organization within the industry called the driving issue and traders collective off to put that training as a discount for anyone in the organization friending instructors. So that again, you know, this is where I take some pride in that I haven't done that, based the spark from the

Christopher Mifsud:

conversations going on, right.

Unknown:

And then 10%, and some other bits as well. Another company I've done a little bit of work with called gore roadie, they're creating a diary management system for instructors. And because of the podcast, and because of my conversation with them, they're putting the choice of pronouns in in that app, which they wouldn't have done without listening to that. Which, you know, I never expected that to happen. It was the goal. I wanted to make changes in industry, but I never expected to happen like that in the first series, but it is spotted, and there's all bits as well around that. You know, there are people there's someone that's there or instructors that are now least thinking about, but I know of one that's definitely do it creating another podcast for instructors. I say that's come up. But what they've specifically told me is call back from listen to my show and talking about it's like, this is what I wanted, this is what I wanted, and it's happening.

Christopher Mifsud:

I get it, I get it. 100% It's so cool. Very, very cool. So Terry, I'm gonna I'm gonna diverge off just a little bit. And one of one of the pillars that we do like to talk about here on Carson, Christopher and the prester leadership podcast, which is leadership. And I always like to ask everyone, how do you define good leadership? We all we've all experienced poor leadership, like we talked about earlier a little bit. But what's good leadership in your book, like, how do you how do you define it?

Unknown:

I think I kind of touched on it before when I was talking about working with an individual rather than a collective or trying to run with the same brush I. I mean, there's lots of different facets to it. But I think it's been adaptable. It's working with a person. So whether that when I look back, and I've not always been intentional, but when I was on the building sites, and had apprentice premises where I was, you know, running a certain section of OSI it was I adapted to the people I worked with them I did the same when I was at McDonald's, I do the same as an instructor now and I'm doing the same on podcasts. It's it's been flexible, adaptable for the people. So some people need to be led by example. Some people need to be led by culture and some people need to be led, just by having a conversation you flippantly joked earlier about the lady that other have an issue this morning. In that role, then I had to change the way I'd been on that lesson. I had to change initially, from a coach to I'm also an authoritarian figure, put my foot on the brake, talk us out of that situation, manage the situation and then pull up and then change again because I then needed to comfort her because she was sort of physically upset at what had happened. So in that space of about a minute I'd have to take three different approaches to manage that situation. And I think that to me that's leadership is it's not one thing it's not someone standing and going you must do this it's it's what that there's absolutely no point me shouting at someone to do something if that's not what they respond to. Some people do but if you're not gonna respond to that there's pointless

Christopher Mifsud:

i think i think few few people do really I find like yelling authoritarian kind of style is it triggers people's fight or flight instinct, and or freeze. I guess it's fight, flight or freeze. Right and generally And workspaces or any kind of instructional space, it's you're going to get that freeze response, which pretty much means that they're not thinking about anything you're trying to tell them right at that moment. So, yeah, you'll get a response is probably not the response you want. So I agree. I agree with that. But I totally agree that Yeah, leadership is all about that flexibility. It's knowing your people. And it's knowing how to handle each individual. I was, like we were saying earlier, when I mentioned, it's like, there are no exceptions, but everyone is an exception. 100%, everyone's an exception, right? Like, as a leader, you learn the skills, like that's the no exception part, he learned the skills and rules that are needed for teach, like for leading people, and then you realize that for every single person that you're leading, you're going to have to take a different tact, and that you're going to have to employ all that same. So that's amazing. You're able to show in like a minute, like three different styles, but it's true, right? Especially in in like, high, high risk or like emotional situations or things are going quickly. Right? That's a true leader, someone who can take control and do what needs to be done in a high pressure situation. You know, and then and get everyone out safely. Right? And I'm sure that's, again, in a in a car. There are I mean, there are like, obviously, that way, you probably drive you drive a vehicle out the extra that extra brake your brake side brake. Yeah, right. Yeah. Yeah. So I mean, there's that but at the same still, at the same time, it doesn't stop any of the other crazy ass actions that human being can take when they're freaked out. Right, you know.

Unknown:

But this is the thing with instructors again, in the any decent instructor could do the initial bit of what I did, any decent instructor can put their foot on the brake Stop the car, either if they need to control the car themselves out of this situation, or in the situation, I did talk the fruits union through getting out of it. Because it's a reaction. And people and instructors are trained to react that way, while prevent and then react. The thing that I personally believe that that's instructors down it's a bit after, is that that

Christopher Mifsud:

emotional connection to comfort. Yeah,

Unknown:

exactly. And that's when I say like the industry is behind. People pass a driving test because instructors teach them how to drive. Sure. There is still in the UK, there is still an average of five people that die on the road every year. And you know, this is in quite a small country. Five people every day, or every day. Yeah. Okay,

Christopher Mifsud:

I thought you said five people per year. And I was like, that's amazing statistic. I was like, come to America, my friend where people die way more than that, like, 100 sample a day. Yeah, it's Yeah, yeah. But larger, a larger a larger number of folks do you know, it's all it's all numbers, this this is But still, I mean, it's, it's, it is important to note that, you know, these things can't happen. And, you know, having better trained people on the road that probably have, you know, a good motional connection and stuff. And I think that that's where it's at, it's it's going back to the thing that's very popular in most industries now with leadership and one of the key components that didn't exist for a really long time. And actually, it was poo pooed on was the emotional connection with people like the EQ right emotional quotient, right? I guess it's intelligent quotient. So it's emotional quotient, right? So yeah, EQ, which I'm a big supporter on and it's something in the thing is that's great is that EQ so that you can teach people, you can actually teach people to be you know, better human beings, like, you know, you're not you're not born being a trash human for the rest of your life. If you don't have to be, you can, you can totally be, you know, nice and awesome and cool and comforting. And, and, you know, like, it doesn't mean that you have to be like, like a pushover or anything like that. That's not what that means. It just means that you can have compassion for people, and take care of them and share, you know, help them along, and so forth, and make people realize that being sensitive, or having emotionals, or reacting to something is not a bad thing. You know, it's just, it's life. It's what people do.

Unknown:

I'm human. I think sometimes knowing when to be honest, is really telling for me, knowing when to shut up, or knowing when not to, like, be an obvious leader being you know, and that struck a chord for me probably about two years ago, when I forget why I did it. I'm also ready, I'll send it somewhere to do it. But I made a list of the people in my industry that I respect, not look up to, and I consider as late as and look at what they're like online. And it's like that there's some Facebook groups for instructors, and they're very venomous places at times. What's in between and arguing, but not backstabbing that, you know, conflict.

Christopher Mifsud:

Yeah, that's great.

Unknown:

Okay, so I know it's the end one on my list isn't in those groups doing that the level everyone else have the arguments every now and again, they'll come in and they'll they'll pull up or stop or they'll comment on some, but they're not in the groups arguing on a phone. That's without realizing it. That's part of the reason why I look up to these guys because they're not like everyone else is just chipping away. And I think that that's part of being a leader as well not lead again this leading by example, not being the person that's just mouthing off all the time, you being the person that's leading by example and doing the right thing so on your farm in your place, so whether that's what you're doing now Christopher with this podcast or what you're doing on Twitter or or wherever you're doing it you're not arguing over people not doesn't mean never debate or never disagree means you're not arguing over people. You're going out there putting these awesome messages around leadership and saying and then getting other people in from other industries like me and like the other guys. So come on in and put their example you're just promoting quality and promoting good people and promoting just a better life almost that's what you're promoting your site. That's leadership. That's,

Christopher Mifsud:

that's what I'm sneakily height. Right? So I had someone who was like, it was like, Oh, you you're doing leadership in the video game industry. I'm like, Well, I'm doing leadership and it's in the video game industry. But even when I do leadership, I'm doing positive leadership and I'm and I'm promoting as much as possible, you know, servant leadership as well. Right. It's, it's like I'm trying to sneak sneak it in there. I'm saying it very blade right now. Be positive, always be positive. Don't be natural. But you can still swear while you're at it at all times. It's alright. Because I think I think this will actually have to put explicit on the on the marker on the for the podcast, but whatever. You know what, that's why you get that check mark. Yep. So another important question, favorite type of donut. I know you're vegan. But but they're but from from, from what I understand that they make these things called vegan doughnuts. So and I hear I hear you got a lead on a good one. So tell us more about that.

Unknown:

Well, I mean, I'm going to caveat this beforehand by saying and this way, get me off the show. I'm not the biggest donut fund. I don't have the biggest sweet tooth. So there's there is a lot of different doughnuts out there vegan, but for vegans, but I think the only one I've had is one I found in local supermarket for us called Morrison's. And it's a fruit salad dollop. And it's just lovely. And you can pick them up for like 50 quid for a pack of five. And as much as I will just say in the driving instructors are unhealthy and we should be eating better. I'll tell you what, all of them fruit salad doors between lessons just perked up a little bit? Well,

Christopher Mifsud:

well, then let's let's talk about let's talk about something that maybe will lead to something a little bit more healthier. How do you how do you find your your Zen what's what's what's your way for mindfulness? I know, I know, you do yoga and some other stuff. You walk like good bit, but yeah, let's let's hear about that. Let's hear. Let's hear. Let's hear about the healthy journey that I know. I know Terry Terry's on.

Unknown:

I mean, this is what you just said, as it called it a journey. And that's right. Because I'm still on that journey. I'm still trying to find out wholeheartedly what works for me, and an experiment. And we're different things like you mentioned, I think yoga and meditation, they're and they're two things that I keep falling back to. And I'm guilty of falling away from them again, as well. But the meditation one, I'm not getting much credit myself, I'm so not very good at things. I'm getting better at doing longer meditations, but five to 10 minutes is my my comfort zone for that.

Christopher Mifsud:

10 minutes more than most people. So there you go. It's about consistency in practice. That's what it is that so yeah.

Unknown:

And I've started doing that between driving lessons. So like in the car between lessons, I'll, I'll have those five or 10 minutes, or I'll get out one, one of the things I do like is just close my eyes and feeling the breeze. So if I can sit or get outside and just lean against car for 10, five or 10 minutes, and it's not necessary, the best meditation there will be something and I find that that really helps between lessons I always miss her. So switch as well, because that you know, there can be quite stressful. I mentioned that the lesson earlier that's used the pedals and I've got an upset student. You know, that's a I'm not a trained counselor, but I've had to be a counselor. And I do it in the moment. Right? Yeah. So to go from that to another lesson can be quite taxing so that that five or 10 minutes really helps settle me down. You mentioned that the yoga as well. I do DDP yoga, which is in DDP the wrestler which I think calls yrg you know, rather than yoga, but But yeah, I started doing that after seeing a video online and that's the thing that killed off fixed my buck. Whereas before lesson, yeah, it did get better when I stopped working on the building size. It didn't actually get that for sure.

Christopher Mifsud:

Sure. If you're not, you're not just you know, prolonging the pain and just reintroducing the injury constantly. Is there. Is there a diamond cutter pose? I'm just curious.

Unknown:

As for the pause, I'm not sure. It's not a pause it is it's like a sequence.

Christopher Mifsud:

So always gonna sequence sort of, like Sun Salutation. It's like or like, or like what, like warrior pose to like, yeah, citation that. So does. He does he has his own sequence, and it's called the diamond cutter. Oh my god, that is brilliant. I love I love I just love the positive. He's a positive guy, too. So that's a there's some positivity there. I'm all about and I've always been fascinated by the DDP yoga. What would you say? Why GRS? Do you think that's why? Why algae yrg?

Unknown:

Because he says, No, I can't do the accent but anymore mas yoga. So I think you change it to Why aren't you?

Christopher Mifsud:

Okay? Yeah, it's

Unknown:

it's pretty brilliant. You know, I've been positive with some of the I'm trying to to adapt as a way of life because I used to, I don't think I've ever been excessively negative, I would allow those negative emotions to come up too often, too.

Christopher Mifsud:

I was there before I understand. It's it takes time and practice. Yeah, people, my wife doesn't believe me. I tell her that all the time was like, I used to be an awful human being. She's like, that's not true at all. I'm like, Okay, I'm glad. I'm glad. That's what do you think now. And that's cool. But you know, I had to learn, I learn how to remove a lot of negative people from my life had to I had to stop thinking negatively as much and just try and be positive. Now. I'm an extremist. So I do admit that like, I had to swing the pendulum very far to the super positive way of life. But now I found a good balance between the two. But I try I try to eliminate negative thoughts. I have a very strong belief that it's not so much that like, more positive things happen the positive people than then the people who who think negatively, I just think that people who think positively, have a bigger, better appreciation and see the positive in their life more often and more regularly, than people who think negatively, the negative people are just picking up on the negative stuff because that's what they want to focus on. And they're just missing out on the positive. Don't get me wrong. There are some people who have shit lives and I'm not gonna I'm not gonna say that has anything to do with positive or negative like life is is is a fickle bitch. And it just does what it does sometimes. But I do think that your state of mind and how you handle those things as they come, you know, can be influenced quite a bit by by how you're thinking, and everything.

Unknown:

I would wholeheartedly agree for me, it's about perception. So I mentioned I think I mentioned before about I've been in an accident in my car. Last Friday, someone someone crashed into their wallet while I was stationary. So come around the corner and pulled up and she just got out of the car and started talking immediately about the damage and apologized and it was her fault. And she accepted that. But the first thing I asked her was, uh, you walk here, and she's like, Yeah, but yeah, no, no, no, don't worry about the car, you will care. And as soon as I it's great, that almost positive spin on it. she calmed down, she relaxed him and we dealt with it. With that then subsequently men that I was without a car from Friday to Monday, but I had a lesson booked over that weekend. Which, you know, is a big chunk of money. I'm getting ready people ready for the test. And Terry two years ago, socks you know, I didn't I allow myself a little bit of assault on a Friday night. But the Saturday and Sunday I just changed my perception. I said it was like I've got a weekend off. I don't know when I have a weekend off. Now. I've got a weekend off. And I couldn't get

Christopher Mifsud:

a drive anywhere but but yeah, I guess it's a good way okay, because I guess they don't have like, you can't rental can't get a rental car for a driving a charger car. Right?

Unknown:

Yes, you can. The problem is I'm sorry, I'm gonna go full on instructor mode for a second. But the problem is because it is a Friday so I'll try and get it sorted out for the weekend is an absolute booger over it sometimes be there in charge is paying for it. So then I had to go through them as well as just me which underlays process more. But see and a slightly less positive note during the whole pandemic that we've been in. Instructors in the UK haven't been allowed to work for large parts of it. Didn't realize this, but a lot of instructors actually sold the car to fund them selves while they were off work. And then when they came back that second higher cars out. So to then get a higher car there's been a lot less available follow. So it's just harder. Okay. But yeah, I

Christopher Mifsud:

walked myself into that, but that's a good explanation. I didn't realize it. But yeah, that makes sense. Still makes 100% sense. sense. So your your gamer, right?

Unknown:

Yes. I don't get anywhere near as much as I like or should

Christopher Mifsud:

but I am I don't either but you know I understand like yeah, so what's your What's your favorite system?

Unknown:

I am currently past four months I've started off many jobs I say my console history.

Christopher Mifsud:

Yeah Give it to me.

Unknown:

The the first one that was a Commodore 64 which was I mean you could probably see my eyes go misty then reminiscing about it. But yeah, I just love that one hour kid. I had forgotten it was CJ the elephant, I think it was called, was my favorite game. I mean, I played all sorts. It'll take about seven hours to load up. But that was awesome. From there went onto the Master System. I think I went to a Super Nintendo. Then in tendo, 64, Xbox, Xbox 360 and then ps4 when that was my route.

Christopher Mifsud:

Okay, and in any mentioned your favorite Commodore 64 four game. My favorite comment or 64 game was the Smurfs game because my brother went to comedies Commodore 64, and he used to play when I used to go visit him. But what's your favorite game now? Or a vault? Or is it or is it the Commodore 64 game which I don't want to believe so I assume there's been a game since then that that is made you go. This is my favorite game of all time.

Unknown:

In terms of reminisce, they probably see jelly elephant. But in terms of my actual favorite game of all time, maybe it will be Skyrim definitely Skyrim I that's still my go to game. Now. If I just want to when we speak before about finding my son. I'll just go hunt rabbits on Skyrim I'll try and spend six hours trashing a bird and failing miserably every time because I should have mentioned while I was atrocious computer games genuinely abysmal.

Christopher Mifsud:

That's always collect cheese. I think that's easiest thing to collect in

Unknown:

a room of cheese in more than my houses. Yeah, just why not? But yeah, I think that's why I love Skyrim so much. It's just because I can just go on air, I can do pretty much anything. And be I can just Potter. I can Potter about doing stuff, which is always fun. For me at least.

Christopher Mifsud:

No, it's good fun. It is good fun. It's actually one of those games that I should probably pick up again. I used to I played it a lot. Back in the day. I mean, I was a vampire and werewolf and whatever else you could be in that game, basically, mostly was it was sneaky sneak attacking and using a bow and, and when shouting dragons, I think before they nerf that, but yeah, but the case might be any other any other favorite games or classics that you really enjoy.

Unknown:

Um, I mean, I'm gonna mention the one before, which was Oblivion, because that's what got me back into gaming. Because I was out of gaming for quite a while. Then I can't remember when it was, but I've got the Xbox 360 and I saw believe in a follow along. It's interesting, like on sale somewhere. So I got it. I spent all night playing it. And that got me back into gaming, which also got me into Skyrim. The other game a big fan of the minute I've gone through once, but I'm on a second run his days gone, which is I suppose a bit similar to insurance and that you can put a lot and just wander around killing zombies. Or they call them creepers.

Christopher Mifsud:

I can. Probably Yeah, yeah, we know what you mean zombies. They're also just another name for zombie. Zombies are great, though. So you can't go around that.

Unknown:

But the other game I play a lot. I'll say a lot for me a lot is Football Manager on the PC. Which is just like managing English football teams. Yeah,

Christopher Mifsud:

yeah. There's people that like that. I get it. I get the thing. It's number crunching, you know? And yes, it's Yeah, that's cool, though.

Unknown:

It's great, because I can read at the same time.

Christopher Mifsud:

There you go. There. Yeah, there you go. Even Oops, sorry. Go on.

Unknown:

No, I'm just gonna say that. I think that's sort of the free that I'm doing.

Christopher Mifsud:

Yeah, I was just gonna say there's two things that you mentioned. And so you mentioned horror movies. So I'm just curious, because I went to school for special effects makeup a long, long time ago and, and did quite a few really crappy horror movies. In my day. They weren't crappy. They're awesome. They're very low budget horror movies. So we will say that so just I'm curious what's what's your favorite favorite horror movie? Like what what stands out for what's in like, what? I guess we what once you see what your favorite horror movie I'll probably be able to guess. Like, what era of horror movies is probably your favorite but maybe it goes against its own say.

Unknown:

You see it's I struggle to answer that question because I would class my favorite horror movie on my favorite movie as different things but they're both horror movies. So I'll tell you both. My favorite horror movie ever is Nightmare on Elm Street. The first one? Yeah, the first one. Okay.

Christopher Mifsud:

Just make sure was original. Yeah. Yeah. That was the second one stream wires. No, that

Unknown:

was the first one. The second one was the the homoerotic one, whichever one was just a phallus. But yeah, Drew mores was the third one. But yeah, no, the first one. And I think part of that is because it's from what I can recall the first proper horror movie ever watched. So it's always sat well with me. And it scared the crap out of me. But my favorite film of all time is jaws. Which is a film. But I don't.

Christopher Mifsud:

I don't I wouldn't call I mean, it is I guess I don't cry. I get where you're coming from for jazz. Jazz is more like classic. I mean, I went to when I was in college to take some film classes. And we watched jaws. I mean, for the cinematography, right. It's all about like, the cutscenes. And the craziest, the horrible giant, like, fake shark that they made and then all the other stuff that goes on. But yeah, that's, I can see that being a favorite movie, because it definitely has actual cinematography, like, merits to it and and stuff. But those are good. Those are good. All right. Very, very cool. And wrestling you mentioned? Well, I know we've talked about wrestling before you're doing DDP yoga. A lot of most folks that I know that get into DDP yoga, do so because they have at least some kind of interest or following in wrestling. Wrestling is one of my, like, things that I have loved as it's from childhood on and it's definitely a guilty pleasure of mine. So I'm just curious, favorite favorite wrestler?

Unknown:

Oh, man, you're asking me some tough ones today with these favorites. Our favorite all time wrestler would be Bret the Hitman Hart.

Christopher Mifsud:

All right. I it's hard to say that because I've got a list of about 17. All right behind him. Sure, sure. Of course. No, it's good. It's good. But you mean like classic classic bright, not like current, grumpy bright? No, I

Unknown:

mean, like, probably early 90s, mid 90s. A time which? Yeah, I mean, Hulk Hogan got me into wrestling. It was the that that music and the muscles and the, you know, the Hulk in office as a kid. That's what got me into wrestling. But I was always drawn to separate heart. And it was only when I'm not exactly.

Christopher Mifsud:

technique.

Unknown:

Yeah, I never realized that as the kid. It was only when it opened my eyes because these matches are actually good to watch. They're not

Christopher Mifsud:

just the right colors. There's actual, like, methodology and execution and skill in there. And, you know, technique. Maybe there's a reason that his father had wrestling school. Who knows? Yeah, you know, like, but no, that's awesome. It's I was a big, I was a big fan of the Heart Foundation as a general as a general rule. And definitely Bret the Hitman Hart was in there. I mean, I was I'm, I'm more violent. I go a little bit more classic, like Ricky, the dragon steamboat. Again, another person who just could execute very well on the ring. Back when most people were just doing slaps, you know, and kicks in, like leg drops. So yeah. Very, very cool. So I like to kind of circle around towards towards it. If someone was looking to get into teaching folks, maybe not just driving chartering, but just teaching folks or podcasting, you know, where you've just kind of, like I said, hit the ground running and just kind of burst out on the scene, what would you recommend to them to get started?

Unknown:

The first thing I'll say is work out while you're doing it, because I'm going to use my industry as a specific example. So many people become a driving instructor because they're told it's easy, because they can talk their soul that connect for 250 grand a year, could work whatever hours they want, you know, they, they're told this stuff, so you kind of just drawn into it. I'm a big believer in if you work out why you want to do something. So I had a few specific reasons why I wanted to become an instructor and become a podcaster. And because I know why I'm doing it. So even on the days answer good even when stuff goes wrong. I've still got a this is why, and then it keeps you going. Whereas before I've always given everything up because I never wanted to do it. I just fell into it. So that's the thing. I will say. The only thing I would say in terms of being a pod. Yeah, in terms of the podcast. Once you've worked out why and once you've worked out what you want to do is then decide is this a hobby? Is it a business? Is it a tool to gain more business and sticking to that and I would also suggest initially, and this ain't gonna be right for everyone, but it was right for me. And so what I probably recommend is start off small start off with like a limited series, this is what I did. So I'm going to go 12 episodes, and I'm going to see if I like it or not, we can do each of episodes, you can finish it. And if at the end of it, you're like, no, it's not for me, you still got a body of work to show. It's true. It's

Christopher Mifsud:

always there. Right? Yeah, it's body work. It's there. It had a start and a conclusion. So it's, it's like a finished piece. Right? It's, yeah, that's awesome. That's really good. I love I love the why, right. You know, there's a there's a writer on leadership called Simon Sinek. who talks about find your why, right? Like, what's your why talks about for companies, for people for everything and why it's so important. It's a I think it's something that more people, you know, there always be money, money will always be a thing, but that should not. Well, I mean, it could be your driving, if that's your why Great, good for you. But I doubt that most people's why's something a little bit more, more down to earth more personal or more, you know, like, you know, I like to do it, because I think it's my purpose, you know, is to do certain things. And that's why that my wife or most of the things I do, but yeah, I think that's that's really sound sound awesome advice. So thank you, Tara for that. So, Terry, we've talked about your podcast, I've been driving charting, like there are multiple ways to find the Terry on the interwebs. And I think it'll be in the liner notes, and so forth. But I think it'd be great to hear from you. Where can people find cherica? And his awesome podcast and his his driving, instructing, like, if you're if you're in that area of the UK, which again, pardon me, because I already forgot. But like, if you're in the area Talk, talk about your area where you're at where you're where you're teaching, because I think a lot of people, if they're in that area, maybe maybe they'll even make the drive to you just learn to drive because or if you're teaching is that locational based, right? It's UK based, right? That's so anywhere in the UK to be clickable?

Unknown:

Well, I mean, first of all, I'm gonna say I'm talking away to myself, because you refer to me as the Terry, which are very much like, I may refer to myself as the terror from everything from that one. I mean, that's pretty awesome. In terms of where I'm based, yes, I am, sort of Leeds Bradford part of Yorkshire. So for driving lessons, actual specific lessons, it would have to be in that area. But for stuff like the the trading courses that I do on the podcast, they're obviously available anywhere. So to find me, if you looking for the podcasts, you can search for the instructor, I can search your five minute theory are, if they're too long to type out, you can type in TC drive, or even my name Terry cook, and it'll bring up the podcasts wherever you're looking for that. Brilliant. The third podcast should be out in about two weeks, which is called driving test tails. So you could be searched for that soon as well, which is tailored about two weeks is

Christopher Mifsud:

it about two weeks, we really be one week because that's that's when you'll be hearing this. So just so you're aware,

Unknown:

but there you go. So in one week, search for driving says tales, which will be stories from people on their driving test, and maybe even some tips on how you can use that you can pass yards as well. So looking forward to doing that one. So find me personally, on Facebook, Instagram, where else my Twitter kind of on Tick tock, but not really kind of on YouTube, but not really. So search for TC drive, you'll find all the instructor if you go on Facebook and look for the instructor has got its own Facebook page over there where you can find more details and, and also you'll get all the notes on my guests there as well. Because anyone that comes on the show, I have to be a fan of them, I have to support and endorse them. So therefore I promote the crap out of everything they do as well.

Christopher Mifsud:

I did the same. So I totally understand. So yeah, I think that's, that's great. I'm very awesome. Anything you'd like to leave the listeners and watchers with, at the end here.

Unknown:

Pay attention to what Christopher says is genuinely really relevant, generally really useful. Now I will be completely honest, I have not listened to all of your podcasts because they're not all applicable for me but you are on my dip into list when I've got a course spine that I listen to. And then I've got the the dipinto list on new IPR some absolute knowledge bombs, and on Twitter. Every now and again I'll see like a blog or a link to but there's also this these lovely little calls that come up and they're genuinely really inspiring. And if you get a chance to work with the mind that is Christopher do it whether it's talking to him on a podcast whether it's liaising with him or whatever he I'm saying he I'm talking to the people, not us. So that's perhaps he is just it's generally a beacon of positivity and an uplift in human being. There's only one downfall to Christopher one downfall. Your beard is so much smaller Pick the mine.

Christopher Mifsud:

Oh, it's Yeah. Well, that's that's that's many, many, many, many of those trouble I see now. But thank you so much terrific Terry or the Terry, for for for all your kind words there and thanks for being a guest today. I really do appreciate you having me on. It's been awesome. So thanks so much.

Unknown:

No, thanks for having me. I've further much enjoyed it. It's, it's always nice to talk about myself.

Christopher Mifsud:

Yeah, isn't it? Alright, cool. All right. Well till next time. That's this week's episode of press Start leadership podcast. As always, thanks for being awesome. If you haven't yet, make sure to give us a follow. Till next time. If you haven't downloaded my free ebook, five heroic leadership skills, click on the link in the description. Tune in next week for your next episode of press star leadership podcast. Thank you